Dave Arnold | General Counsel

David Arnold, Ph.D., J.D., is involved with legal issues concerning privacy, negligent hiring, employment testing and equal employment matters. He also serves as General Counsel for the Association of Test Publishers. In this capacity, Dr. Arnold has testified on many occasions before various legislative committees on issues related to testing.

Dr. Arnold’s prior background includes HR-related positions with Supermarkets General Corporation, the University of Nebraska, the City of Omaha, United Airlines, Reid London House and NCS Pearson. He holds a J.D. from Loyola University Law School and a Ph.D. in industrial psychology from the University of Nebraska. He is an active member of the American Bar Association’s Section of Labor and Employment Law and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology ("SIOP").

He has also served as Chairperson of the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Legal Issues and currently serves on the State Affairs Committee of SIOP. Dr. Arnold has also written more than 100 articles regarding testing and employment law/legislation and spoken frequently to various HR and other trade groups regarding these topics. In 2009, he was the recipient of the “Award for Professional Contributions and Service to Testing”, presented by the Association of Test Publishers.

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Criminal Background Checks vs. Integrity Testing

David Arnold discusses the pros and cons to criminal background checks and offers an alternative that can help employers screen out a higher portion of non productive employees.

Read more about Criminal Background Checks vs. Integrity Testing

Reasonable Accommodations for Employment Testing

Reasonable accommodation has long been recognized as an essential component of the hiring process, including the administration of assessments. Additionally, it is legally mandated under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While the ADA does not define reasonable accommodation, it provides a list of examples of what might constitute a reasonable accommodation. Read more about Reasonable Accommodations for Employment Testing

House Appropriations Bill Blocks Implementation of EEOC Guidelines

On April 25, 2012, the EEOC released new guidelines regarding employers’ use of criminal conviction information in the employment process. In the wake of the release of these guidelines, the business community, as well as other interested parties, has indicated that the guidelines go way too far in their restriction of employers' use of criminal background information. Read more about House Appropriations Bill Blocks Implementation of EEOC Guidelines

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