How Often do Employees Lie, Cheat, and Steal?

After being stripped of seven Tour de France titles and an Olympic bronze medal, Lance Armstrong finally came clean about his use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. It seems that cheating, and then lying about the cheating, is becoming more widespread in sports, especially when the stakes are high. For example, some of the best baseball players of all time (e.g., Pete Rose, Barry Bonds, Mark McGuire) will likely never be inducted into baseball’s Hall of Fame because of their scandals.

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Should You Share Test Scores With the Test Taker?

An administrative question our clients commonly pose is whether test scores need to be shared with job applicants. This issue generally arises when a non-competitive applicant requests information regarding their test score due to the perception that the test was the basis of having their application rejected. The intent of this article is to summarize the issues surrounding these requests and discuss whether employers should release this information. Read more about Should You Share Test Scores With the Test Taker?

4 Reasons Why You Should Be Testing Incoming Students for Admissions and Placement

Prior to admitting a student into your educational program, there are many questions that can only be answered by assessments. John Picone shares four reason why testing should be a key part of your admissions and placement process.

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The Cost of Student Disengagement

It is alarming that disengaged students represent approximately 18% of postsecondary students. Simply put, disengaged students are less motivated to improve their educational outcomes, and they place less emphasis on their education. It is perhaps no surprise, then, that disengaged students have the poorest educational outcomes, which are costly to the student, the institution, and society. Read more about The Cost of Student Disengagement

What You Can Ask During a Job Interview

On October 28, 1992, John Otero went into a Wal-Mart store in Las Cruces, New Mexico to interview for a job as a receiving clerk. During that interview, he was asked the question, “What current or past medical problems might limit your ability to do a job?” Unbeknownst to the interviewer, Otero had been injured in an automobile accident a few years before causing his right arm to be amputated below the elbow. Read more about What You Can Ask During a Job Interview

Synergy in Testing: Combining Assessments for Optimal Results

There are all sorts of tools you can use for screening job applicants. Two are particularly effective when used together…

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How to Get More from a Reference Check

Reference checks are an essential step in your hiring process. As someone who has conducted a significant number of them in my career, I know they can be extremely time consuming and don’t always yield the most insightful information.

However, reference checks have the potential to provide you with some of the most critical, timely, and valuable information you could ask for:  actually knowing how a candidate has performed on the job. Certainly, past performance is a strong predictor of future performance. But simply verifying employment dates and asking superficial questions will typically leave you in the cold. You need to make sure that you ask the right questions.

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