EEOC

EEOC Review of Integrity Testing

Integrity tests have been used by employers for well over two decades to help identify productive employees that will not engage in various forms of workplace counterproductivity (e.g., theft, turnover, illegal drug use, safety infractions). Read more about EEOC Review of Integrity Testing

Debunking 4 Myths Around Personality Testing

Recently, I responded to an article that incorrectly spelled out four reasons to avoid personality testing in the hiring process. The article said that personality tests:

    • Screen out great candidates
    • Have flawed results
    • Create privacy risks
    • Cause discrimination
Read more about Debunking 4 Myths Around Personality Testing

What You Can Ask During a Job Interview

On October 28, 1992, John Otero went into a Wal-Mart store in Las Cruces, New Mexico to interview for a job as a receiving clerk. During that interview, he was asked the question, “What current or past medical problems might limit your ability to do a job?” Unbeknownst to the interviewer, Otero had been injured in an automobile accident a few years before causing his right arm to be amputated below the elbow. Read more about What You Can Ask During a Job Interview

What is Disparate Impact?

In simple terms, disparate impact occurs when a practice or hiring standard that is neutral and non-discriminatory in its intent has a disproportionately negative impact on individuals within certain subgroups protected by civil rights laws (e.g., race, gender, age).

Many hiring practices exhibit disparate impact, including: Read more about What is Disparate Impact?

Reasonable Accommodations for Employment Testing

Reasonable accommodation has long been recognized as an essential component of the hiring process, including the administration of assessments. Additionally, it is legally mandated under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While the ADA does not define reasonable accommodation, it provides a list of examples of what might constitute a reasonable accommodation. Read more about Reasonable Accommodations for Employment Testing

House Appropriations Bill Blocks Implementation of EEOC Guidelines

On April 25, 2012, the EEOC released new guidelines regarding employers’ use of criminal conviction information in the employment process. In the wake of the release of these guidelines, the business community, as well as other interested parties, has indicated that the guidelines go way too far in their restriction of employers' use of criminal background information. Read more about House Appropriations Bill Blocks Implementation of EEOC Guidelines